How to Use In Text Citations for a Website

How to Use In Text Citations for a Website. When you use information from a website in your paper, you must include an in-text citation.

Checkout this video:

Introduction

In order to give credit to the sources you used to write your paper, you will need to include an in text citation anytime you quote, paraphrase, or summarize someone else’s work. You will also need to include a Works Cited page at the end of your paper that lists all of your sources in alphabetical order by the author’s last name.

There is no one correct way to cite a website in MLA format, but your in text citation should give enough information for your reader to find the information you are quoting, paraphrasing, or summarizing in your Works Cited page.

What is an in-text citation?

An in-text citation is a brief reference to a source of information used in the body of an essay. When writing in MLA format, in-text citations are inserted into sentences using signal phrases and parenthetical references. A signal phrase includes the author’s name followed by the verb “says,” “states,” or “writes.” A parenthetical reference is a brief reference to a source enclosed in parentheses immediately following the quoted or paraphrased text. The parenthetical reference typically includes the author’s last name and the page number from which the quotation or paraphrase was taken.

When do you need to use an in-text citation?

Any time you quote, paraphrase, or summarize material from another source, you need to provide an in-text citation. An in-text citation is a brief reference to the source of information in your paper. It includes the author’s last name and the page number where the information can be found.

Here are some examples of when you would need to use an in-text citation:

-When you directly quote material from a source
-When you paraphrase material from a source
-When you summarize material from a source

If you’re unsure whether or not you need to use an in-text citation, ask yourself whether the information you’re using is common knowledge or if it comes from a specific source. If it comes from a specific source, then you need to provide an in-text citation.

How to format an in-text citation

When you’re citing a website in MLA format, you’ll need to follow basic guidelines for citing print sources. Include the author’s name, the title of the article or page, the name of the website, the date you accessed it, and the URL.

Here’s an example:

According to The Associated Press Stylebook (2017), “In general, spell out numbers one through nine and use figures for 10 and above.”

You would then include this citation at the end of your paper in your Works Cited list.

Using in-text citations for websites

When citing a website in MLA format, you must include the website name, the date you accessed the site, and the specific URL or page within the website that you used. For example:

According to The National Weather Service (n.d.), “A winter storm is any cyclone in which snow or ice are the primary precipitation type.”

If no date of publication is given, use (n.d.) in place of the year.

Examples of in-text citations for websites

When using in-text citations for websites, you will want to include the title of the article or page, the date you accessed it, and the URL. Here are some examples:

According to Jones (1998), “Students often had difficulty using APA style” (p. 199).
Jones (1998) found “students often had difficulty using APA style” (p. 199); however, he also found that “most students seemed to handle in-text citations relatively well” (1998, p. 201).
Citing Web Pages In Text
If the author is not named, use either the article or website title to begin your citation. Remember that titles of articles and Web pages are not put in quotation marks but titles of chapters and books are. For example:
The territory known as Yukon was mandated by the British government in 1898 (“Yukon History”).

Tips for using in-text citations

When citing a website, include the author, date of publication, title of the article, name of the website, and the URL.

If there is no author, begin the citation with the title of the article.

If the date is unknown, use “n.d.” (for “no date”).

For example:

According to the National Institutes of Health (2020), “E-cigarettes are devices that heat a liquid into an aerosable aerosable aerosable aerosable consumablenicotine-containing vapor” (para. 1).

Or:
The National Institutes of Health (2020) states that “E-cigarettes are devices that heat a liquid into an vapor containing nicotine” (para. 1).

Things to avoid when using in-text citations

There are a few things you want to avoid when using in-text citations for a website. The first is using the URL of the website as your citation. This is not necessary and can actually lead to errors in your paper. The second thing to avoid is using the date you accessed the site. While this information can be useful, it is not necessary for in-text citation purposes. Finally, you want to make sure that you are using the author or organization names properly. For in-text citation purposes, these names should be listed alphabetically.

Conclusion

It is important to include in text citations when you are quoting or paraphrasing information from a website. This gives credit to the original source of the information and allows your readers to easily find the source if they want to read more.

There are a few different ways to format in text citations for a website, depending on how much information you have about the source.

If you have the author’s name, you can use this format:

Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. “Title of Article.” Title of Website, Publisher or Sponsor of Website, Date Published, URL.

For example:
Robinson, Nadia. “How to Cite a Website.” TheWriteLife, 8 May 2017, https://thewritelife.com/cite-website/.

If you do not have the author’s name, you can use this format:
“Title of Article.” Title of Website, Publisher or Sponsor of Website, Date Published, URL.

For example:
“How to Cite a Website.” TheWriteLife, 8 May 2017, https://thewritelife.com/cite-website/.

Further reading

For more information on in text citations for websites, see the following resources:

-Purdue OWL: In-Text Citations: The Basics (https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_intext_citations_the_basics.html)

-The MLA Style Center: Citing Web Pages (https://style.mla.org/citing-web-pages/)

Scroll to Top